In the lab with… María del Carmen Vale González. Professor in the Department of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary

In the lab with… is a place where which we will present the Campus Vida researchers’ talent and excellence weekly through five questions.

María del Carmen Vale González

Professor in the Department of Pharmacology, College of Veterinary

Degree in Pharmacy from the University of Santiago de Compostela (1992). Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Barcelona (1998). A 6-month predoctoral stay at The Royal Danish School of Copenhagen. A 2-year postdoctoral stay at the Center for Neural Science, New York University.

She has worked as an associate professor in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Castilla-La Mancha between 1999 and 2004 and as a Parga Pondal researcher in the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela between 2004 and 2009.

This doctor currently teaches in the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela: 2009-2010. Her scientific contributions have been: 42 papers in international journals, 6 book chapters, 6 patents.

1. Who is the most important scientist of the twentieth century for you? Why?

Neher and Sakmann for their studies on ion channels.

Dr. Neher investigated biophysical and molecular principles of information flows between neurons, which are key to Parkinson’s and Alzheimer disease. In the 1970s, Neher and Sakmann developed techniques, called Patch-clamp, to measure the flow of ions through cell membrane channels, and they received the Nobel Prize in Physiology, or Medicine, in 1991.

2. Which discovery changed the world? Why?

In line with the above, I highlight the progress made in the discovery of the properties of various ion channels.

3. Why did you decide to be a researcher?

Because of my curiosity; I’ve always enjoyed looking for answers.

4. What is your most important research line? What results do you expect to obtain and what impact may they have on society?

My most important research line is based on Alzheimer’s disease, neurodegenerative diseases and ion channels. We have also developed research lines on therapeutic applications of marine compounds in the treatment of these pathologies.

Neurodegenerative disease research plays a vital role as a generator of new knowledge and technologies, as an essential ingredient in identifying problems and solutions, and as a key element to ensure the implementation of fair and effective interventions.

5. In what way do you think that the “Campus Vida” surroundings improve your research?

Through the integration between the university and the health system, which enables “Campus Vida” philosophy businesses.

This integration will support the enrichment of our research, will cut the time required for the results to be used in clinical practice, and will therefore benefit society.

Comments are closed.